All About Nickels

Nickel five cent pieces were first minted in 1866. The first nickel was the Shield type that portrayed the shield of the United States with the date below the shield and the words “In God We Trust” above the shield. The reverse has the number “5” in the center with either stars and rays surrounding it or stars […]
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The 1883 “Racketeer” Nickel

In 1883 the Mint issued a new 5c coin with the head of Liberty and a Roman “V” meaning “5” on the reverse. Many people thought that the coin was an error since in didn’t have “cents” anywhere on the coin. The lack of the word cents created an opportunity for the unscrupulous. The coins were gold […]
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The 1918 over 17D Buffalo Nickel

The rarest Buffalo Nickel is a mint error! It was caused by a worker punching an “8” over the “7” on a reused 1917 die. This resulted in both numbers being visible on the coin. The error was not discovered by collectors until 1931, so most of the coins made it into circulation. Uncirculated pieces exist today […]
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1937-D 3 Legged Buffalo Nickel

A Buffalo Nickel with three legs? For over three generations, the 1937-D Buffalo Nickel “three legger” has fascinated collectors and the public alike. Caused by the results of an improper attempt to repair a damaged die, many escaped into circulation before inspectors at the Denver Mint caught the error. The coins’ outstanding feature is the […]
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The Buffalo Nickel

The Buffalo Nickel was first introduced in 1913 and was minted every year through 1938 except for the years 1922, 1932 and 1933. Coins were struck at the Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco Mints and over 1.2 billion pieces were made before the series ended. The design features a realistic portrait of an American Indian […]
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“Hobo” Nickels

Carved nickels appeared about the same time as the Indian (Buffalo) nickel was issued in 1913. Hobos (not to be confused with bums, tramps or yeggs [see below]), were traveling men who worked for food, shelter or offered services such as lawn or wood cutting or “handy man” type repairs. For some reason, the Indian’s portrait became […]
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