Obsolete and Unusual Coinage of the 19th Century

The 19th century in the United States was a period of great change and experimentation in the U.S. coinage System. Many different kinds of coins were tried out. Some coins like the 1/2 cent, became obsolete because of inflation. New kinds of coins were issued because they were thought to be convenient and would aid the flow […]
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Mint Marks

Mint marks are letters that identify where a coin was made. The letter can appear anywhere in the design but usually is placed near the date or in an area near the edge of the coin. The combination of the date and the mint mark or lack of one can have great importance to a coin’s value. For […]
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U.S. Coin Grading

Grading is a method by which one can describe the present condition of a coin in comparison to it’s condition at the moment of manufacture. From the moment coins are minted, coins get marks and blemishes from contact with other coins and from being in circulation. Grading gives collectors a common language by which they […]
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Coin Identifier

No matter what country your coin is from, all coins share similar characteristics. For example, all coins have Heads & Tails or as coin collectors like to say, Obverse & Reverse. Some coins have portraits on both the Head and Tail side. In that case the Head side is the side with the date. If […]
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Coin Terms Explained

The front or head of a coin is called the Obverse and the back or tail of a coin is called the Reverse. The principal design object represented on a coin is the called the Type, such as the Liberty $20 gold is a different type than the St. Gaudens $20 gold. The space between […]
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Rare Coins in your pocket

Coin dealers require stock to sell, the same as any other kind of sales business. The difference is that stock is often acquired from the public instead of a factory. Classic rare coins must be acquired from advanced collectors or from an auction but lesser rarities can show up almost anywhere including in ordinary change. […]
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Composition of Pre-1965 Modern U.S. Coinage

Cent (1864 -1982) weight 3.11 grams .950 copper .05 tin Nickel (1866- weight 5 grams .750 copper .250 nickel Dimes (1873 -1964) weight 2.5 grams .900 silver .100 copper Quarters (1873-1964) weight 6.25 grams .900 silver .100 copper Half Dollars (1873-1964) weight 12.5 grams .900 silver .100 copper
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